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Never Before Heard! – Famous 1988 Lake Erie Coast Guard UFO Event Update – Audio Witness Testimony!

Coast Guard personnel responding to citizen reports of unusual aerial activity over Lake Erie on March 4, 1988, witnessed classic UFOs near Eastlake, OH. Sheila and Henry Baker were driving home with their three children about 8:35 P.M., after taking them out to dinner, and were almost home. As they neared the waterfront, Sheila noticed something hovering over the lake; they drove down to the beach to investigate and got out of the car. The moon was bright, and there was ice on the lake; Sheila could hear it cracking like claps of thunder.

Plainly visible was a huge, gunmetal gray, football-shaped, silent object rocking back and forth, blinding white light emanating from both ends. Then the object began moving, swinging one end toward the shore and descending. The Bakers became frightened, ran back to their car, and fled. When they got home, the object was still visible from a window facing the lake. Sheila hid the children in a closet, fearing that the thing might come and get them.

The object moved out over the ice and continued to descend, with red and blue lights now flashing in sequence along its lower edge. Sheila called the Eastlake police to report a UFO, and after several referrals, with no one expressing much interest, was told that unusual activity over the lake would be the responsibility of the Coast Guard. Suddenly five or six bright yellow triangular objects shot out of the center of the large object and began darting around independently (satellite objects). Once they stopped and hovered point up around the parent object, then sped away to the north, turned east, then inland toward the Perry nuclear power plant.

At this point Sheila called the Coast Guard, which sent a team to their house to investigate. Seaman James Power and Petty Officer John Knaub arrived towing a Boston Whaler (a seaworthy boat) just in case. They told the Bakers that they had seen some lights over the lake from Fairport Harbor and thought they were flares, maybe fishermen trapped out on the ice. However, when Sheila pointed to the main craft and some of the triangular objects still zipping around it, the men drove closer to the lake to investigate, accompanied by the Bakers. At the lakefront they could hear the ice rumbling and roaring.

Here is the actual Coast Guard Report…

In their incident report sent later by teletype to Coast Guard headquarters in Detroit, MI, the men were quoted as saying that “the ice was cracking and moving abnormal amounts as the object came closer to it.”

Power and Knaub gave a running report on what they were seeing to their base via the two-way radio in their Chevy Suburban. The window was down, and the Bakers overheard them saying words to the effect: “Be advised the object appears to be landing on the lake . . .

There are other objects moving around it. Be advised these smaller objects are going at high rates of speed. There are no engine noises and they are very, very low.”

Abruptly one of the triangles zoomed straight toward the Coast Guard vehicle, a blur of light, then veered east, straight up, and came down beside the parent object. Two witnesses in separate locations also reported seeing the triangles. Cindy Hale was walking her dog when she noticed a triangular object hovering overhead, and her dog began to whine and cower (animal reactions). She took the dog indoors and came back out to watch. The triangle flashed a series of multicolored lights, then accelerated and was gone without making a sound (hover-acceleration).

Tim Keck was using his astronomical telescope when one of the triangles caught his eye. He had a cheap throwaway camera with him and snapped a picture of the object before it flew away over the horizon. The photograph was analyzed by optical physicist Bruce Maccabee, who considered it to be a legitimate.

Now for the first time, here the actual Aufio Witness Testimony from Sheila and Henry Baker recorded in 1988 and unheard until now!

Peace,
Michael Lee Hill